1. About the Bachelor of Applied Social Science

Are you passionate about helping disadvantaged groups of people?  If you have firm thoughts about what could and should be done to help groups that need support, this is the program for you. By studying a Bachelor of Applied Science in Community Services, you’ll be able to enter a range of dynamic roles in the community and public sectors.

Graduate employment opportunities

The need for skilled, empathic workers in the field of Community Services is growing. Here are just some of the avenues that you may find a long a fulfilling career in:

  • Child and family services
  • Homelessness
  • Alcohol and other drugs
  • Domestic violence
  • Migrants and refugees
  • Community counselling agencies
  • Disability services
  • Aged care
  • Local government councils
  • Indigenous groups

As a graduate of this course, you will be able to apply for membership of the ACWA, the peak body for community services professionals.

  • Delivered by Torrens University Australia (TUA), building on the 40 years experience of our sister college, Jansen Newman Institute, in delivering tertiary counselling courses, this course focuses on practical training while providing a solid grounding in the relevant theory. It includes fieldwork placements, ensuring that you graduate with valuable experience and industry contacts.

Course Overview

Course Title Bachelor of Applied Social Science (Community Services)
Study Options – Domestic Australian students Full-time

Part-time

Study Options – International students This course is available to international students requiring a visa to study in Australia
Start Dates June, September, February

For specific dates visit the website

Course Length Full Time: 3 years

Part-time: Options available

Payment Options – Domestic Australian students Upfront payment

This means tuition fees will be invoiced each semester and payment is required on or before the due date.

FEE-HELP

FEE-HELP is Australian Government’s loan scheme for higher education degree courses. It can assist you in paying for all, or part of, your course fees. Repayments commence via the tax system once your income rises above a minimum threshold. Just like with any other debt, a FEE-HELP debt is a real debt that impacts your credit rating.

Payment Options – International students Upfront payment

This means tuition fees will be invoiced each semester and payment is required on or before the due date.

Course study requirements It is expected that each subject, whether studied online or on-campus, will involve a combined total of 120 hours of structured and self-directed learning, which equates to approximately 10 hours a week for subjects over 12-week trimesters. Assessment  Assessments vary and include: critical analysis and essay writing, literature reviews, needs assessment, project development and evaluation, in-class debates, participation in online discussion forums, short questions, and research projects.
Locations ·         Online

·         Adelaide

·         Sydney (Pyrmont)

Delivered by Torrens University Australia
Provider Torrens University Australia Ltd is registered as a self-accrediting Australian university by the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA). CRICOS Course Code 097401C
Provider obligations Torrens University is responsible for all aspects of the student experience, including the quality of course delivery, in compliance with the Higher Education Standards 2015 Accrediting body Torrens University Australia Limited ABN 99 154 937 005,
CRICOS Provider Code: 03389E.
RTO No. 41343
Course Fees For details, refer to the website. Any other fees For details, refer to the website.
  1. Essential requirements for admission

The general admission criteria that apply to Torrens University Australia courses can be located by visiting the Torrens University Australia website – /general-admission-information-for-torrens-university-australia-ltd.

  1. Student Profile

The table below gives an indication of the likely peer cohort for new students at the institution. It provides data on students that commenced undergraduate study and passed the census date in the most relevant recent intake period for which data are available, including those admitted through all offer rounds and international students studying in Australia

Note: This course is being offered for the first time in trimester 2, 2018 and consequently, there is no previous student data available to form a student profile (below).

Applicant background Semester one / Full year intake [T1 2019]

Number of students Percentage of all students
(A) Higher education study
(includes a bridging or enabling course)
6 7%
(B) Vocational education and training (VET) study 5 6%
(C) Recent secondary education:

·         Admitted solely on the basis of ATAR
(regardless of whether this includes the impact of
adjustment factors such as equity or subject bonus points)

Nil  
·         Admitted where both ATAR and additional criteria were considered
(e.g. portfolio, audition, extra test, early offer conditional on minimum ATAR)
Nil  
·         Admitted on the basis of other criteria only and ATAR was not a factor
(e.g. special consideration, audition alone, schools recommendation scheme with no minimum ATAR requirement)
<5 NP
(D) Work and life experience
(Admitted on the basis of previous achievement other than the above)
12 14%
International students 63 72%
All students 88 100.0%

Notes:       “<5” – the number of students is less than 5.

N/A – Students not accepted in this category.

N/P – Not published: the number is hidden to prevent calculation of numbers in cells with less than 5 students.

  1. Admission Criteria
Title of course of study Bachelor of Applied Social Science (Community Services)
Applicants with higher education study ·         A completed higher education qualification at AQF level 5 (diploma) or above, or equivalent, from an Australian University or another accredited higher education provider

OR

·         Successful completion of at least 1 EFTSL (equivalent full time student load, or one full year) of an AQF level 6 (Associate Degree) or above, or equivalent, from an Australian University or another accredited higher education provider

Applicants with vocational education and training (VET) study

·         A completed vocational education qualification at AQF level 4 (Certificate IV) or above, or equivalent, from a registered training organisation (RTO)

OR

·         Successful completion of at least 1 EFTSL (equivalent full time student load, or one full year) of an AQF level 5 (Diploma) or above, or equivalent, at a registered training organisation (RTO)

Applicants with work and life experience Demonstrated ability to undertake study at the required level:

·         broadly relevant work experience (documented e.g. CV), demonstrating a reasonable prospect of success; OR

·         formal, informal or non-formal study, completed or partially completed, demonstrating a reasonable prospect of success; OR

·         written submission to demonstrate reasonable prospect of success.

English Language Proficiency

(applicable to international students, and in addition to academic or special entry requirements noted above)

International Students

Equivalent IELTS 6.0 (Academic) with no skills band less than 5.5

Applicants with recent secondary education

Year 12 or equivalent

Other admission options

 

Special Entry Applicants in any category whose study, work or life experiences have been impacted by disability, illness or family disruption will be given special consideration for admission. Each application will be considered on its merit, based on the evidence supplied by the applicant attesting to the circumstances of the applicant. Applicants for special entry may need to complete written or numerical tasks to assist with assessing eligibility for admission.
  1. How to apply

Via direct application to the institution

  1. Advanced standing/academic credit/recognition of prior learning (RPL)

You may be entitled to credit for prior learning, whether formal or informal. Formal learning can include previous study in higher education, vocational education, or adult and community education. Informal learning can include on the job learning or various kinds of work and life experience. Credit can reduce the amount of study needed to complete a degree.

Applicants admitted based on prior higher education study may be eligible for Advanced Standing in the form of credit and/or recognition of prior learning (RPL) under the Torrens University Australia Credit Policy – (/policies-and-forms).

  • Students with completed subjects may be eligible for specified credit and/or elective exemptions
  • Students who have completed a qualification at AQF level 5 (diploma) or above may be eligible for block credit (where a block credit agreement exists)
  • Students with a mix of formal study and informal and/or non-formal learning may be eligible for recognition of prior learning in addition to any credit approved.

Credit will not be applied automatically. Applicants must apply for credit and/or RPL as early as possible prior to each study period, with applications not accepted after week 2.

For further information about credit and recognition of prior learning please see /apply-online/course-credits.

  1. Where to get further information

Quality Indicators for Learning and Teaching (QILT) Website.

With QILT, you can do side by side comparisons of the quality of the higher education institutions and the study areas that you’re interested in.

  1. Additional Information

Course Structure

This course consists of 24 subjects, each with a value of 10 credit points.

  • Level 100 comprises 8 core subjects (as per Diploma of Applied Social Science)
  • Level 200 comprises 7 core subjects, with 6 of these being common with the Bachelor of Applied Social Science (Counselling), and 1 elective subject
  • Level 300 comprises 6 core subjects, with 3 of these being common with the Bachelor of Applied Social Science (Counselling), and 2 elective subjects.

Course Rules

This course consists of 24 subjects, each with a value of 10 credit points.  To successfully complete the course, a student must gain 240 credit points (24 subjects) and successfully participate in the required workshops.

Subjects

Subject Descriptor

COU101A Interpersonal Communication

This is a core unit in all the Applied Social Science courses.

This subject explores aspects of counselling as a form of interpersonal communication and considers the role of self and culture, as well as important relational skills such as perception, listening and reflection. Students learn about different modes of interpersonal communication including verbal, nonverbal, written and oral, as well as the barriers to effective communication and approaches for overcoming them.

The subject also examines how different types of relationships (family, work, personal, and social groups) can be enhanced through effective communication. An informed awareness of power and rank is discussed.

WEL101A Introduction to Community Services

This is a core unit for the Counselling and Community Services majors.

This subject introduces students to the structure, purpose and nature of the Australian health care system and community services. It explores the many contexts, settings and roles within this area of work, including the policies, theories and practices applicable to this field. Students learn about the important role and function of occupations in community services, and the practices involved such as advocacy, lobbying, networking, and support and service coordination. Students develop an understanding of the variety of community sector organizations that operate in Australia, sources of funding provided by local, state and federal governments, and the challenges, barriers and opportunities for accessing and providing the relevant but scarce resources to those in need. Attention will also be given to community development and programs through examples such as public housing, Indigenous community development, community consultation and public fora.

SOC102A Understanding Societies: An Introduction to Social Analysis

This is a core unit in all the Applied Social Science courses.

In this subject, students are introduced to the interdisciplinary practice of social analysis and its role in understanding the various human elements and social institutions that constitute our communities and societies. It covers a variety of important social theories through which to understand human practices, identities and social structures. In particular, students learn how cultural, historical, economic and political factors shape the human experience.

Students develop social analysis skills to critically examine how human and social elements shape our views about equality, justice and fairness. The subject encourages students to assess the relevance of these elements to our social and professional relations.

COU102A Theories of Counselling

In this subject students are introduced to influential counselling theories, including Psychoanalytic and Psychodynamic theories, Person-centred Therapy, Existential Therapy, Gestalt Therapy, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, Family Therapy, Feminist Therapy, Solution-Focused Therapy and Narrative Therapy.

The subject utilises a range of experiential learning strategies including skills modelling and case studies, and introduces students to the counselling interventions used for each of these models. Such understanding is further developed in COU104A Applied Counselling 1, where students have the opportunity to observe and practise some of the therapeutic interventions used within these modalities.

COU103A Human Development Across the Lifespan

This is a core unit in all the Applied Social Science courses.

This subject introduces students to the field of developmental psychology and explores what drives or motivates human behaviour. It examines the key life stages of birth, early and later childhood, adolescence, young adulthood, mid-life, ageing and death, taking into account their social and cultural contexts. Students are introduced to the work of scholarly work on the subject of human development.

Drawing on a diversity of disciplines, topics include theories of attachment, cognitive and social development and the role of families and communities in supporting healthy development.

WEL102A Health and Well-Being

This is a core unit for the Counselling and Community Services majors.

This subject provides the context for understanding health and well-being in Australia. It begins by exploring the critical perspectives associated with defining health and well-being, and what impacts these definitions have on various sections of the community, especially those considered most marginal.  Health policies, perceptions and promotional activities are analysed as to their impact on health equity and access to services and resources for various sections of the population. The health of individuals, community and society is also discussed in terms of the workplace, the environment and the proximity to service centres such as cities and towns. Students learn about current debates and the impact of service-users, consumer advocates and worker responses. International policies and research will inform many of the discussions.

COU104A Applied Counselling 1

This is a core unit in all the Applied Social Science courses.

In this subject, students are introduced to the core skills for counselling and change work, with specific reference to working with adults. The subject provides students with an opportunity to develop their counselling skills in an interactive and supportive learning environment with feedback from others, and to begin considering their preferred counselling style. The interrelationships between counselling theories and models and skills are explored. This subject also focuses on the research into counselling outcomes and effective change processes.

SOC103A Developing Social Policy

This is a core unit in all the Applied Social Science courses.

In this subject students examine the nature and practice of social policy development through a study of key public policy areas such as education, health, welfare, the family, crime and law and order policy, drug and alcohol policy and employment policy. The focus of policy discussions is primarily within the context of Australian social, economic and political systems.

Students examine the theoretical underpinnings of policy development, the role of politics and lobby groups in influencing social policy, the policy process, and how policy decisions are monitored and evaluated. The role of associations, such as NCOSS and ACOSS, and churches in monitoring the impact of government policy and advocating for vulnerable groups within society are also examined, with a view to students considering ‘how else’ policies can be informed and used effectively to bring about change and improvement to social conditions.

COU202A Mental Health and the Community

This is a core unit for the Counselling and Community Services majors.

This subject is designed for students to gain basic understanding of mental health. It includes definitions of mental health, mental health theories, risk factors and disorders. The impact of mental illness in the community, and particularly on individual people’s lives is explored along with approaches to health care, and the role of advocacy by community care workers and services.

Myths and stigma surrounding mental health are critically examined, with special focus on how social and cultural perceptions shape both the experience of mental illness and service provision. The subject includes definitions and classification systems in mental health.

COU203A Applied Counselling 2

This is a core unit for the Counselling and Community Services majors.

This subject builds on the knowledge and skills developed in Applied Counselling 1. It helps students develop a greater understanding of the various therapeutic approaches that draw on psychodynamic theories, person-centred therapy, cognitive behavioural therapy, family therapy, feminist therapy, solution-focused therapy and narrative therapy. The subject also examines the influence of the counsellor on the counselling process, and counselling practice with children, adolescents and families, drawing on the developmental knowledge acquired in the subject Human Development Across the Lifespan.  Students develop a greater understanding of the skills needed for various modalities and reflect on their own development as a therapist.

FLD201A Fieldwork 1

This is a core unit for the Counselling and Community Services majors.

Students undertake placements comprising 200 hours in the community sector with the aim of building skills with a variety of client groups and presentations. The organizations can include community counselling agencies, government counselling or welfare centres, child/youth service or aged care facilities, neighbourhood centres, correctional facilities, or hospital pastoral care settings. They gain further practical experience in working with individuals and groups and are supported with supervision in a variety of formats such as weekly debriefing and case conferences.

This provides the opportunity for students to learn from contact with other community services workers, critical incidents, ethical dilemmas, tensions, questions and insights. This subject uses an experiential learning process that is based on theory, and group participation with peers and supervisors. Students are required to attend two 3-hour workshops in weeks 1 and 5 to prepare them for their fieldwork. Students also receive a total of 5 hours supervision by the placement supervisor.

SOC201A Mediation and Conflict Management

This is a core unit in all the Applied Social Science courses.

As our number of relationships expands, so too does the potential for conflict. This subject looks at the nature of interpersonal conflict, and explores strategies for resolution such as mediation, conferencing and restorative justice. It begins by considering the nature of conflict, theories about its causes, and how conflict manifests in relationships, groups, communities and internationally. It then introduces students to key conflict management strategies and gives steps as to how we might reduce unhealthy forms of conflict and arrive at positive, healthy relationships based on empathy and understanding. The subject also considers anger management strategies in addressing entrenched, high conflict situations.

SOC202A Introduction to Social Research Methods

This is a core unit in all the Applied Social Science courses.

This subject gives students an overview of the methods used in social science research. It examines the models and techniques of social research across quantitative and qualitative methods, including surveys and sampling, questionnaires, focus groups, structured, semi-structured and unstructured interviews. It asks, what is the research basis of knowledge and how do we know what we know? It prepares students for understanding the nature of the research process, through direct application of basic interview technique, transcription and first level analysis. Students learn to reflect on their findings and the process involved for conducting social research through their experience of interviewing using techniques such as unstructured, semi-structured and structured interviews, and through a scholarly analysis of literature on research methods.

WEL201A Managing the Needs of Diverse Client Groups

This is a core unit for the Community Services major.

This subject helps students develop an understanding of diversity in Australia and examines the evolution of multiculturalism since colonization. Students develop the skills for working effectively with diverse client groups such as Indigenous Australians, people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds including migrants and refugees, and a variety of other minority groups.  Drawing on case studies and experienced guest lecturers from the field, the subject examines community welfare in practice, including how various government and non-government agencies respond to issues of difference and social disadvantage through community development interventions. The various concepts of citizen, consumer, service user, client and consultant are examined to understand how different agencies define the rights and responsibilities of people accessing services.

WEL202A Ethics and Professional Practice

This is a core unit for the Counselling and Community Services majors.

This subject introduces students to ethics from a variety of perspectives, including deontology and consequentialism, principlist and virtue ethics, narrative and communitarian ethics, and the ethics of self-care. Students learn how ethical and legal frameworks are applied to community services, and in the clinical, public health, and research contexts. They learn to reflect on what are legal or ethical dilemmas in health and community care provision, and practice the use of the conceptual and legal tools available to health and community services workers, as well as to the public, for making decisions in relation to health, community care and counselling.

Topics include ethics theories, codes of ethics for professionalization, and ethics for research, public health, disability and vulnerable groups, internal reporting and whistleblowing, and the ethics of self-care. All practitioners must know how their work is regulated by legal frameworks; students thus learn about tort and negligence law, professional responsibility, duties, and misconduct, mandatory reporting, the protection of vulnerable groups, and privacy and confidentiality at work.

COU301A Working with Addicted Populations

 

This is a core unit for the Counselling and Community Services majors.

This subject provides an overview of the principles of substance‐related addictions and the processes and mechanisms that underlie addiction. Students are introduced to the developmental course of addiction, risk and protective influences, and the effects of addiction on health and well-being. The subject covers different forms of addictive behaviours that present in the community, including substance dependency (alcohol, tobacco, prescription and illicit drugs), problem gambling, and compulsive sexual and eating behaviour. A critical examination of the concept of addiction will consider why the use of some substances or behaviours is socially problematic and culturally contingent. The subject adopts a multi-disciplinary approach to examine the biological, psychological and social factors that are associated with addictive behaviours. Students learn to critically appraise and reflect on the shift from the disease model to approaches that draw on behavioural and social scientific theories.

FLD301A Fieldwork 2 for Community Services

This is a core unit for the Community Services major.

This placement is of 200 hours duration. Placements are in the community sector or in an organization where students will gain further practical experience in working with individuals and groups.

The practical placement experiences will be supported with supervision in a variety of formats; this provides students with the opportunity to practice a range of activities such as case management, client services, program planning and development, individual and group assessment, advocacy and support work. Students are required to engage in community service work in these placements working alongside other professionals. Students are also required to attend two 3-hour workshops in weeks 1 and 5 to prepare them for the fieldwork.

Formal supervision will occur at a rate of 1 hour per 40 hours of placement work.

SOC301A Qualitative Research Methods

This is a core unit in all the Applied Social Science courses.

This subject builds on Introduction to SOC202A Social Research Methods, and helps students further extend their skills in qualitative methods that are particularly relevant and useful to social science research in the sectors of health, community services, counselling and human resources. It assists students to understand the process of research, including developing proposals before undertaking research, specifying research questions, selection of the most appropriate research methods for the question, sampling, data collection, data analysis and reporting. Students learn through practice how to conduct semi-structured interviews, focus groups, and/or observation exercises, and reporting the results. The subject covers some techniques and methods for analysing data, including discourse, thematic and narrative analysis.

WEL301A Community Development

 

This is a core unit for the Counselling and Community Services majors.

This subject introduces students to the theory, principles and skills of community development practice as a way of building capacity in community groups over the long term. The philosophical basis of community development as a method of social change and social action through building consensus, participation, advocacy and democracy are examined. Examples of innovative community development programs in public housing, Indigenous communities, disadvantaged areas and cultural communities are an important part of this subject, and guest lecturers from the field will provide practical examples of community development. In acknowledging the diversities and differences within communities, students consider the possibilities for collaboration, advocacy and strategic community planning in initiating action and change. Students develop community development skills in working with advisory groups and communities, community consultation, and running public forums in order to develop their skills as community development practitioners.

WEL302A Case Management and Program Development

This is a core unit for the Community Services major.

This subject examines the practice and skills required for case management and program development in the community services sector, by drawing on examples from a range of client groups such as the elderly, people living with disabilities and chronic illness, homeless people, ex-offenders, refugees and migrants with settlement issues. The subject includes an overview of the theory and practice of program planning, development and evaluation using case studies that address the complex and varied needs of clients groups. In addition, attention is also given to the role of carers and the unpaid support given by relatives, friends and neighbours, which often constitute informal management and support to people in need.

Other topics include formative and summative methods of evaluation, insider/outsider debates about evaluation programs, and working with stakeholders to identify the needs and the programs required to address them, and how to evaluate the programs. Various methods of evaluation are examined, including interviews with key informants, client satisfaction surveys and focus groups, and students also learn how evaluation data are analysed and presented.

WEL303A Human Rights and Social Advocacy

This is a core unit for the Community Services major.

This subject examines human rights and governments’ responsibility to uphold them. Topics include: theories of power and oppression, the concept of empowerment, the human rights movement, the establishment and significance of institutions such as the United Nations and the World Health Organization, and their role in developing and implementing international agreements on the fundamental principles of human rights such as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In addition, students examine the link between human rights and health and well-being, the protection of the rights of citizens, workers, and vulnerable groups, the concept of advocacy and its practice in promoting social change, and the role of human rights commissions, ombudsmen, and guardianship and other health tribunals.

Electives
Subject Descriptor

COU201A Relationship counselling

In this unit of study, students will gain an appreciation of the role of language and culture in the formation of identity through the study of social constructionism; the formative carer-infant relationship is studied in attachment theory; students are also introduced to the theories of influential figures in the field of relationship counselling including Schnarch, Gottman, Satir, Minuchin, Whitaker, Bowen, Haley, de Shazer, Bateson, The Milan Group, and White. Students will be familiarised with typical clinical issues, and theoretical learning will be complemented by students reflecting on their own experience as a person in a culture and in relationship.

COU307A Existential Psychotherapy

The practice of existential counselling and psychotherapy is grounded in three thousand years of Western philosophy, involving itself with the everyday concerns of human existence and attempting to seek answers to what it means to be human.  This subject will explore how existential philosophy is practised both as a specific psychotherapy modality as well as how the existential themes and questions can be integrated into any practice.

COU308A Focusing: Enhancing the Mind-Body Connection in Therapy

Usually we refer to our thoughts and feelings to guide us in life, yet there is a more profound knowing: our “felt-sense”, the body’s own wisdom. Focusing is a process that enables us to access this inner knowing. In this experiential workshop you can learn how to consistently tap into and trust your inner knowing.

Your body never just holds your struggles, it also holds the way forward. Through Focusing you naturally arrive at your own healing and a lasting and deep change in your relationship with yourself.

You can use the skill of Focusing to enhance your own life and to enhance the work that you do with clients. It is a method which can be integrated with and supports any modality of psychotherapy. The importance of body-sensing in healing was discovered by Dr Eugene Gendlin in collaboration with Carl Rogers at the University of Chicago in the 1960’s.

COU309A Introduction to Gestalt Therapy

The elective provides an introduction to the foundation principles and core concepts of Gestlat Therapy theory, methodology and contemporary practice. The electives are also designed to provide the students with an introduction to a creative approach to working sensitively and systematically within the professional relationship.

The focus in this unit is on assisting students to understand and apply the Gestalt Therapy Approach to their personal and professional experience and the group process. Particular attention is given to the core concepts of: (1) awareness; (2) the personal narrative; (3) the cycle of experience; (4) organismic self regulation; (5) contact, contact styles and boundary functions; (6) dialogues and the personal conversation; (7) the paradoxical theory of change; and (8) experimentation and a unit of work.

COU306A Narrative Therapy

In this elective, students will become familiar with key narrative concepts and there will be some comparison with ideas found in other modalities. The central practices and skills associated with narrative therapy will be illustrated and, by drawing on students’ own stories, they will have vivid, first hand experiences of narrative from both a practitioner’s and client’s point of view.

COU310A Spirituality and Psychotherapy

This program highlights our evolving understanding of that vital yet mysteriously elusive reality termed “human intimacy”. Special attention will be given to notions of romance, sexuality and spirituality. The course also seeks to highlight parallel dimensions and contrasts between personal and therapeutic relationships. The discussion seeks to foster an integrated path for understanding psychotherapeutic intimacy beyond the inadequacies of diagnosis, symptomology and pathology.

COU304A Alcohol and other drugs

This subject introduces students to theories and research in the area of substance abuse. It examines the continuum between drug use, abuse, dependence and addiction, and the physical dependence created by the use of prescription and recreational drugs. It also examines the role of family, community, residential and detox services. Students investigate and apply analytical skills for discussing the controversies and social stigma surrounding drug and alcohol use, and the contrasting ideologies underpinning harm minimization, risk and abstinence. Attention is given to programmes such as Alcoholics Anonymous, AI-Anon and Narcotics Anonymous that use the 12-step programme, step reduction programmes available on the web such as Smart Recovery, assessment methods such as the CAGE questionnaire. The subject also covers policy informing programmes, and the dominant models for drug and alcohol counselling, including motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT).

CDC302A Social Enterprise

The theoretical base of this subject focuses on developing the students’ understanding of the fundamental contemporary theories of social entrepreneurship and a variety of applicable business models.
Students will explore the application of entrepreneurship business strategies and apply this knowledge through a philanthropic context.
Students will be expected to:
· identify a social problem that needs to be solved;
· progress an idea through a business development lifecycle;
· conduct face to face user interviews utilising a self‐constructed questionnaire;
· visualise quantitative and qualitative data; learning the basics of using a business
model and value proposition canvas;
· create and present a professional‐level business deck along with a functional
prototype.

Locations

The Bachelor of Applied Social Science (Community Services) can be studied fully online or at the below Torrens University Campuses:

  • Queensland (Brisbane)
  • New South Wales (Sydney)
  • Victoria (Melbourne)
  • South Australia (Adelaide)

Campus Facilities and Services

All campuses are designed to provide students with professional spaces in which to learn and work. They have been planned with student study needs in mind with well-equipped accessible learning spaces as well as student breakout areas for group work and spending time with friends.

A positive student experience

Torrens University Australia values the importance of a positive student experience, and therefore has robust processes to resolve student complaints.  The Student Complaints Policy, and associated procedures, can be accessed from the website (/policies-and-forms).

Paying for your qualification

We offer two payment options for this course:

  • Upfront payment

If you want to complete your qualification debt-free you can choose to pay as you go. This means tuition fees will be invoiced each semester and payment is required on or before the due date using EFTPOS, credit card or direct transfer.

  • FEE-HELP

FEE-HELP is Australian Government’s loan scheme for higher education degree courses. It can assist you in paying for all, or part of, your course fees. Repayments commence via the tax system once your income rises above a minimum threshold ($45, 881 in 2019-20). Just like with any other debt,
a FEE-HELP debt is a real debt that impacts your credit rating.

Further information about FEE-HELP, including eligibility, is available at:

Austudy and Abstudy

Students enrolled in this course may be eligible for government assistance, such as Austudy or Abstudy.