Bachelor of Branded Fashion Design

The fashion industry is looking for a new breed of designer. Individuals who can combine fresh and inspiring designs, with an understanding of how to produce for commercial success.

The branded fashion designer’s role is to find the most creative, strategic, sustainable and cost-effective solution. Developing a commercial awareness of how to create, build and sustain a brand and align it with a target market is a critical skill.

Bachelor of Branded Fashion Design focuses on the design, production and branding of garments. Throughout this Branded Fashion Design course you will learn how to create and brand a range of design solutions, and use the latest software to communicate your product design ideas.

Discover how to produce clothing designs according to project budgets and timelines, and find out how to manage the integrity and positioning of a brand. Investigate the theory behind design and marketing, evaluate communication and branded fashion strategies, explore the role of social media in marketing and scrutinise current, present and future fashion trends. You’ll enhance your forecasting, project-management and drawing skills, and discover the difference between fashion and clothing, and brand and designer labels.

CRICOS CODE
090293C

Key Study Outcomes:

About the School

Billy Blue College of Design courses are delivered by Torrens University Australia Ltd, ABN 99 154 937 005, RTO 41343, CRICOS 03389E.

Read more about Billy Blue College of Design

Billy Blue College of Design

Course Delivery

Can’t find what you’re looking for? Contact a Course Advisor

Workload and Assessment

No. of timetabled hours per week:

Each subject involves 10 hours of study per week, comprising 3 hours of facilitated study and 7 hours self-directed study

Typical assessment includes:

Practical assignments, research projects, presentations and reports

Subject Information

In this subject, students will simultaneously study the human body and its ergonomics whilst developing the skill of visual representation and communication through the art of drawing. It acknowledges drawing as a fundamental skill of the designer, and its importance in communicating design ideas. Students will cultivate an understanding of human movement, balance, proportion and shape by developing their observational and drawing skills. Students will also develop their ability to visually render various surfaces, fabrics and structures as they learn to understand the manner in which different materials and fabrics drape, shape, change and interact with and on the human body. This subject underpins the development of fundamental principles of apparel design such as proportion, materiality and coordination, as well as the capacity of the student to visually communicate their designs.

Design Studio 2 offers an introduction to the building blocks of creating and developing brands and is designed to give students a broad understanding of the stages and methodologies adopted in the brand development process. The subject draws on the theory and practice that sits behind brand creation. It covers the broad spectrum of brand development, values, trends and branding techniques, as well as fundamentals such as brand positioning and brand architecture. The subject also explores the relationship between branding and audiences, cross-cultural influences and shifts in consumer behaviour. Students must first understand and apply the fundamentals of branding and then go on to use that knowledge as the basis for developing and progressing a brand. This theoretical and practical subject will equip students with the knowledge and insight with which to build their own branding expertise.

In this subject students develop foundational design studio practice skills and knowledge in fashion creation. Students acquire specialist practical and theoretical skills and knowledge such as concept development, fabric manipulation and draping. Throughout the subject, students work to develop their conceptual ideas and translate them into a commercial garment design. At the same time students will broaden their understanding of a design studio environment and the interplay between individual and peer responsibilities in a studio context. In addition, students cultivate a broader comprehension of design studio practice through the exploration of 2D and 3D forms and objects. Students gain a deeper understanding of design elements and principles as key design concepts, by conceptualising and producing 2D and 3D design outcomes. The concepts of thermoplasticity, resiliency, dimensional stability and drape are incorporated into this exploration.

This subject introduces the importance of clothing structure, shape, form, line and volume. A variety of cutting, sewing and finishing techniques and terminology are introduced through the examination of constructed garments and the execution of a variety of sewing samples. Through the analysis of a manually deconstructed garment, students are able to familiarise themselves with the various components that make up a garment and the interrelationships between those components. Using this knowledge, students execute and assemble a self-designed garment that addresses an understanding of the structural purpose and interrelationships of individual pattern pieces. Students will be
required to make decisions about the most appropriate construction techniques to use based on the relevant market position.

Students have the option of participating in a Sewing Skills program – a series of additional sewing workshops that run concurrently with their formal study. These weekly two hour workshops provide students with an opportunity to further develop their garment construction skills, should they so choose.

The subject introduces the student to various aspects of the elements of design, e.g. materiality, form and shape, colour, positive and negative space etc. utilised in creative problem solving. Initially students are introduced to a design development process, from the tangible to the digital; through paper model making with its inherent skills development and risk taking, then on to further digital development using newly introduced software. Concurrent, weekly, individual homework tasks focus on understanding and appreciation of materials, their many varied uses, properties and the manufacturing processes related to them. Students will make incremental progress towards choosing a material in which their individual design can be realised. The submission will include a material and colour folio. The final submission will be a model executed in an appropriate material with its function/usage contextualised with all relevant information gleaned throughout the trimester.

This introductory subject places design process and practice within the context of a chronological survey of major historical eras of influence. Students are encouraged to engage with the historical socio-political movements influencing design trends of each era through research and reflection. Academic skills (research, referencing, essay writing, and sentence structure) and design software skills are taught in weekly lessons. Students use the academic and software skills to document historical research and generate creative responses to the themes of historical eras.

This subject provides the opportunity for discourse on the “meaning” of fashion, branded fashion and clothing. The students will study various texts and historical periods to develop their sensitivities and understanding of the “fashion phenomenon” and clothing behaviour.
Examination of several case studies of fashion occurrences will inform the student of the issues, attitudes and foundations that may lead up to the formation of a fashion, the role of the designer in that process and its effect on general dress behaviour as a result. Students research a variety of historical periods and develop a digital design folio depicting clothing of the studied periods in addition to an essay on a chosen historical period. To compliment this study, students will gain digital design foundation skills and techniques used to present their work.

This subject is twofold e.g. hand drawing and computer drawing skills development. Students develop hand-drawing skills to depict, show their understanding as well as explore technical and construction details for apparel. In addition students demonstrate their understanding of clothing history and fashion by isolating key recognisable garment design elements and principles specific to the identified historical periods. In addition to a folio with hand drawings, students develop a digital folio with fully annotated and proportionally correct garment drawings. In order to transfer their hand skill drawings they are introduced to CAD drawing methods and folio layout specific for branded fashion.

By analysing and evaluating their hand drawings they select and synthesis these into a computer generated document.

This subject provides a management framework used by a design team to streamline and monitor the product development process from conception through to production and product delivery. Students will develop their ability to plan projects over the timeframe of a year and allocate jobs in a studio setting.

In addition they will critically analyse the typical workflow of several design studios in different settings and evaluate the enterprise management systems that may or may not be applicable for each situation. Students will then develop a series of Excel worksheets that are appropriate to every substructure of the work stream in a variety of design studio settings.

The theoretical foundation of this unit develops the student’s understanding of the international fashion systems and the different market classifications that exist therein. Students will develop this understanding through an analysis of the criteria that underpin market segmentation of fashion at the retail, consumer and design level. Students will be required to develop a digitally produced folio with their own design fashion adaptations relevant for specific market segments.

The aim of this subject is for students to develop and employ Major specific skills to discover and define a design problem followed by the development and delivery of an outcome whilst employing collaboration and negotiation skills. Every individual works towards prototypes, instigated and critiqued through group collaboration. The construct of this subject is “Problem Based Learning*” (PBL). Students work in groups towards an individual solution as a result of critique and research as a basis for PBL. In allocated groups, individual knowledge and skills are brought back to the groups for discussion and sharing. During these collaborations students benefit from the knowledge and skills and critique of the other group members. The PBL process is staged in 2 sets, students are assessed on their 1) collaboration skills; 2) individual research skills; and 3) individual project solution reached at the end of the subject. *Problem-based learning (PBL) is a method of learning and teaching which allows students to focus on how and what they will learn. An unfamiliar problem, situation or task is presented to the students (by the lecturer or tutor) and students are required to determine for themselves how they will go about solving the problem. This usually occurs through small group work and allows students to utilise their prior knowledge in the topic area and identify the gaps in their knowledge as they attempt to solve the problem. PBL is a studentcentred approach to learning that encourages students to be selfdirected, interdependent and independent as they attempt to solve the set problem.

The aim of this subject is for students to develop and employ their digital skills to answer to, and present a design outcome whilst developing collaboration skills. The project outcome focuses on the digital application of the design solution. This can be by means of 3D printing of the prototypes and/or digital augmentation of a physical 3D environment or 2D document. The construct of this subject is “Problem Based Learning*” (PBL). Students work in groups towards the digitised solution. In allocated groups students bring their individual knowledge and skills back to their groups for discussion and sharing. During these collaborations students benefit from the knowledge and skills of the other group members. The PBL process is staged in 3 sets of 8 steps and students are assessed on their 1) collaboration skills; 2) individual research skills; and 3) group project solution reached at the end of the subject. *Problem-based learning (PBL) is a method of learning and teaching which allows students to focus on how and what they will learn. An unfamiliar problem, situation or task is presented to the students (by the lecturer or tutor) and students are required to determine for themselves how they will go about solving the problem. This usually occurs through small group work and allows students to utilise their prior knowledge in the topic area and identify the gaps in their knowledge as they attempt to solve the problem. PBL is a studentcentred approach to learning that encourages students to be selfdirected, interdependent and independent as they attempt to solve the set problem.

The subject introduces business practices such as costing, time management, value engineering and general models of monetising and valuing output typical of a variety of design industries. Case study analyses’ of a typical design industry business practices, domestic and international, acquaint students with the differences and similarities that exist. Students learn about contractual agreements, and where appropriate become familiar with international shipping and distribution terms as well as an introduction to design copyright laws. Initial overview of time allocation practices and the creation and understanding costing terms such as: Bill Of Material (BOM) /Scope of Work / Deliverables used in typical projects is followed by application. Students plan a project from start to finish through to the development of an appropriate project management plan for their particular industry such as time management charts with typical dependencies highlighted and costed.

This subject focuses on form, shape and internal structure of garment design. Initially students will manipulate fabric on a mannequin to build up a series of forms. These forms will then be developed and technically structured. This process will enable the student to compile their library of basic shape patterns for future use in commercial and industry settings.
Students will extend this practice into an experimentation of fabric manipulation on a dummy to create garments that reflect their own aesthetics. Students will develop these ideas into a series of technical drawings. They will then select one garment from their range for production in fabric of their choice with an emphasis on the technical engineering innovation and design structure.

This subject develops the students’ approach to and the application of knowledge and skills when answering a given brief placed in a commercial context. Students will be required to experiment with the idea of subculture to inform their design starting point. The emphasis of the brief is on shape, proportion and ergonomics as students learn how to measure and accurately depict the key details of fashion products.

Students investigate surface design, and a variety of applications, e.g. placement print, embroidery, and repeat print patterns.

Students design a group of garments that relate through style, and usage intended for an identified consumer target market, in response to a given brief.

The outcome of this subject is a portfolio and technical pack typical for a “fast fashion” or niche market environment for offshore production to industry standard.

This subject provides students with the opportunity to develop both their textile knowledge and skills in manually and digitally generating original prints and colours for apparel. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between textile type, print design and garment.
Students will develop their knowledge of colour theory and its relationship to fabric and fabric designs. They will be expected to integrate colour in the development of a range of print designs (placement and repeat) for fabric. Students will have the opportunity to develop and print one fabric strike off from their own design. The brief will require students to undertake a small research project to
forecast colours and patterns.

In this unit, students are required to apply their advanced computer design knowledge to produce a technical portfolio to communicate
the technical requirements of their garments designed in FA307 Branded Fashion Production. The technical portfolio must facilitate communication between the designer and the production team in the fabrication of garments. The outcome is an industry folio of technical documents containing annotated drawings of the entire product range developed in FA306. This document will provide evidence of the students’ understanding and familiarity with the principles and practices of the industry, specifically in relation to communicating a design with manufacturers and in product costing garments. Students will be required to manage their own work, including industry liaison, so that unit deadlines are met. In this module students demonstrate their computer skills and their advanced time management skills.
Students collaborate to exhibit their major work to the industry in a group exhibition.

The outcome of this subject is the development and production of a commercial marketing and merchandising brand pack, which can be fully digitally produced. Students extend on their brand essence and rationale by using photography, graphic design or digital media design to communicate their brand collateral and product line. In a problem based learning scenario, students work together to provide critique and feedback to the design development of the work of the members of their peer group in order to solve their design problems in view of a product showcase presented to an industry panel.

In collaboration with industry, each student is required to develop a product series in response to a brief. Students will be required
to research the market and develop a brand and its products for their target group. Whilst they develop their collection, students will need to liaise with the various sections of the industry pertinent to their chosen design theme or market. They will orchestrate the product development and fine-tune the progress towards a satisfactory outcome. The aim of this unit is for students to experience a real industry setting and to produce a small range of products that shows their ability to see a project through from start to finish. In addition, students will further develop their ability to problem solve and clearly communicate with various segments of the industry. Students are required to produce/ manufacture a small group of coordinated garments to dress two people, the combination of which should be decided during the project. Each student’s finished product is exhibited during showcase for judging by an industry panel. Students collaborate to exhibit their major work to the industry in a group exhibition.

Students will be offered the opportunity to work within a professional design studio experience for an extended period of time. It encourages students to build long-term relationships with the design industry and exposes them to the rigour of applied design practice while building their confidence in adapting to new environments. It also provides a context in which to enhance their communication skills and work collaboratively in a professional arena. Students will be matched to an appropriate mentor at the placement site and monitored by an academic in the discipline of study.

Here for good. We believe society is best served when our students, faculty, and our entire organisation use our collective skills and experience to create positive and lasting change. Our students and graduates are improving lives and making our world better. Our institutions are providing the critical skills, knowledge and support to help make this happen. Social Enterprise is an exciting theoretical based subject driven by the desire to create positive change through entrepreneurial activities. By providing students with a framework to understand business model generation and the skills to source, evaluate, and measure opportunities, Social Enterprise empowers students to conceptualise, develop, and propose new ventures that focus primarily on social change for good. In addition, this subject helps students understand and analyse different entrepreneurial business strategies, as well as incorporate theoretical discussions on major trends and issues in the social economy.

In this subject, students continue to develop their knowledge of digital applications used for the staging and compilation of folios, look books and technical drawings commonly used in apparel design. Based on their acquired knowledge of the different aspects of showroom, promotional and technical portfolios used in the industry, students will explore non-conventional ways to develop their own staging style for their professional folio for each setting.
The subject is designed from a professional perspective and addresses several requirements. It draws on the student’s ability to visually communicate to the production team the technical aspects of the garments they design and it requires the students to evocatively and adventurously communicate their designs in order to generate sales. In addition, the design look book will enable the student to communicate their understanding of what constitutes a collection.

This unit provides students with the opportunity to design a coordinated group of branded fashion products that clearly exhibits their relationship through design style, fabric choice and manufacturing techniques. Design work in this unit is underpinned by the theory of coordination in garment design, including the formation of a collection and the relationships of individual items. Students will be required to conduct research within a given target and niche market to identify needs and opportunities; this research is augmented by a search of materials, accessories and manufacturing techniques. The culmination of this unit is a collection of a coordinated range compiled appropriately to typical industry requirements. Students are expected to demonstrate their flexibility and creative problem solving acumen to build a product line within industry confinements.

This subject requires students to work independently whilst planning, initiating and developing their own merchandise plan for a department. Students study cases of specific and successful branded fashion companies’ practices and models. Situated in a traditional Problem Based Learning environment, students collaborate online within a group to adapt and negotiate the solutions to a set brief and problem. The subject focuses on: trend analysis, development of an Open to Buy plan, sales forecasting and, running the Open To Buy (OTB) calculations. In addition students learn to adapt the Open-to-Buy forecasting tool in different scenarios to determine the amount of money allocated for future deliverable merchandise. Students develop their independent decision making skills when analysing actual sales, inventory, and turn, to project the subsequent sales and buying plan.

Through readings and case studies, students will investigate several occurrences of a fashion in a variety of products with a critical focus on responsible design and sustainability. They will investigate how a design idea moves through the population groups and subcultures of society into mainstream and what other factors govern and influence its outcome, i.e.: how an idea survives and becomes a fashion. They will explore this in the context of trend analysis, fashion marketing and brand development. Students will further expand on their acquired knowledge by developing a marketing strategy for a fashion brand.

This subject requires students to work independently when designing and building a social media strategy for a fashion brand. Students study cases of specific and successful Australian branded fashion and fashion PR companies, their practices and strategies. Situated in traditional Problem Based Learning environment students collaborate online within a group to adapt and negotiate the solutions to a set brief and problem. Students collaborate online with their peers to critically review and analyse their understanding of social media and its application. They identify and build on their knowledge in understanding the Social Media Landscape and its many features by demonstrating its usage and benefits for brand fashion companies. Students develop a coherent body of knowledge of the range of social media tools that currently exist and are used in the branded fashion industry underpinning the marketing and branding division of such businesses. Students need to demonstrate their cognitive and creative skills whilst identifying a range of scenarios for the development of
a Social Media strategy for a fashion brand and critically analyse the Return on Investment for their chosen approach. In addition students will demonstrate their communication skills and present their ideas and knowledge of their chosen social media scenario to their peers and teachers in a simulated boardroom scenario.

Student Showcase

Prior Learning

If you have Any Diploma or Advanced Diploma from the BSB or SIT Training package, you may upgrade to this course.
Please see the course credit page for more information.

Qualification Subjects Credited Credit Points Course Credit Agreement