Bachelor of Digital Media (3D Design & Animation)

Gain Design Skills for a Cutting-Edge Career

Like the idea of creating worlds and characters, and bringing these to life? Want to tell fantastic stories and to visualise the imaginary, the impossible, the future? By completing a 3D Design and Animation degree, you will get all of the essential knowledge, skills and experiences you need to take on a career in 3D design or animation for film, TV, games, advertising, information/education and beyond. Acquire broad and flexible hands-on skills in modelling, rigging, animation, texturing, lighting and compositing. At the same time you will explore design and animation theory and context to enrich your creativity and storytelling, while working through briefs and creative processes used by industry. In your final year you can apply for an internship with a professional 3D design and animation studio, and get the chance to work on a live project for a real-world client. You will also have the chance to compliment your specialisation by taking elective subjects in Motion Design, Interaction Design or Communication Design. You can pick and mix elective subjects to further tailor your degree to your goals.

CRICOS CODE
090297K

Key Study Outcomes:

About the School

This course is provided by Billy Blue College of Design at Torrens University Australia. RTO 41343 CRICOS 03389E.

Read more about Billy Blue College of Design

Billy Blue College of Design

Course Delivery

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Workload and Assessment

No. of timetabled hours per week:

Each subject involves 10 hours of study per week, comprising 4 timetabled study hours and 6 personal study hours.

Typical assessment includes:

Practical assignments, research
projects, presentations and reports

Subject Information

This subject develops foundational skills in 3D design and animation. Students will undertake character and set design and development exercises, and will generate animated 3D graphic elements. In this way students will develop foundational skills in the principles and techniques of modelling, texturing, lighting and animation required to produce digital 3D characters, environments and props. The subject also explores key concept development stages typical to common 3D design briefs and projects.

This subject introduces the foundational theory and practice of motion graphic design and live action camera production. The unit introduces basic skills in concept development, asset creation, 2D animation and compositing suitable for motion graphic production.

The process of developing a live action video piece is also introduced, from pre-production through to post-production, and including fundamental sound design principles. Students will gain basic skills in camera-based production including basics of lighting, sound recording and editing.

This subject continues the exploration of the theory and practice of interaction design for digital media. The subject covers core research and concept development methods for interaction design. Students will focus on interpreting and structuring information content for interactive non-linear presentation and delivery, and will also focus on visual aspects of interface design and the ways in which visual design affects end-user experience.

This subject provides an introduction to the fundamental theory and practice of interaction design. Key concepts including experience, interface and interaction are explored, along with fundamental technologies, services and platforms pertinent to the design and production of interactive digital media. Students will also investigate the social, cultural and technological frameworks that inform interaction design and identify the relationships between each.

Design Studio 2 offers an introduction to the building blocks of creating and developing brands and is designed to give students a broad understanding of the stages and methodologies adopted in the brand development process. The subject draws on the theory and practice that sits behind brand creation. It covers the broad spectrum of brand development, values, trends and branding techniques, as well as fundamentals such as brand positioning and brand architecture. The subject also explores the relationship between branding and audiences, cross-cultural influences and shifts in consumer behaviour. Students must first understand and apply the fundamentals of branding and then go on to use that knowledge as the basis for developing and progressing a brand. This theoretical and practical subject will equip students with the knowledge and insight with which to build their own branding expertise.

The subject introduces the student to various aspects of the elements of design, e.g. materiality, form and shape, colour, positive and negative space etc. utilised in creative problem solving. Initially students are introduced to a design development process, from the tangible to the digital; through paper model making with its inherent skills development and risk taking, then on to further digital development using newly introduced software. Concurrent, weekly, individual homework tasks focus on understanding and appreciation of materials, their many varied uses, properties and the manufacturing processes related to them. Students will make incremental progress towards choosing a material in which their individual design can be realised. The submission will include a material and colour folio. The final submission will be a model executed in an appropriate material with its function/usage contextualised with all relevant information gleaned throughout the trimester.

This introductory subject places design process and practice within the context of a chronological survey of major historical eras of influence. Students are encouraged to engage with the historical socio-political movements influencing design trends of each era through research and reflection. Academic skills (research, referencing, essay writing, and sentence structure) and design software skills are taught in weekly lessons. Students use the academic and software skills to document historical research and generate creative responses to the themes of historical eras.

This subject develops foundational skills in drawing, visual perception and exploration. Students engage with the practice and theory of various drawing modes, including life and environmental drawing, in order to enrich the concept development process. In addition to developing general visualisation skills students will also work in concept development forms specific to specialist areas of digital media practice.

This subject provides an introduction to the fundamental theory and practice of moving image and 3D design and production. Students will be familiarised with a basic set of tools and techniques for creating moving image sequences and 3D visualisations. Fundamental moving image, screen language and spatial design concepts are introduced, and students will use these concepts in conjunction with basic production techniques to communicate and convey narrative. The subject also introduces concept development techniques and materials specific to the development of motion and 3D design outcomes.

The aim of this subject is for students to develop and employ Major specific skills to discover and define a design problem followed by the development and delivery of an outcome whilst employing collaboration and negotiation skills. Every individual works towards prototypes, instigated and critiqued through group collaboration. The construct of this subject is “Problem Based Learning*” (PBL). Students work in groups towards an individual solution as a result of critique and research as a basis for PBL. In allocated groups, individual knowledge and skills are brought back to the groups for discussion and sharing. During these collaborations students benefit from the knowledge and skills and critique of the other group members. The PBL process is staged in 2 sets, students are assessed on their 1) collaboration skills; 2) individual research skills; and 3) individual project solution reached at the end of the subject. *Problem-based learning (PBL) is a method of learning and teaching which allows students to focus on how and what they will learn. An unfamiliar problem, situation or task is presented to the students (by the lecturer or tutor) and students are required to determine for themselves how they will go about solving the problem. This usually occurs through small group work and allows students to utilise their prior knowledge in the topic area and identify the gaps in their knowledge as they attempt to solve the problem. PBL is a studentcentred approach to learning that encourages students to be selfdirected, interdependent and independent as they attempt to solve the set problem.

The aim of this subject is for students to develop and employ their digital skills to answer to, and present a design outcome whilst developing collaboration skills. The project outcome focuses on the digital application of the design solution. This can be by means of 3D printing of the prototypes and/or digital augmentation of a physical 3D environment or 2D document. The construct of this subject is “Problem Based Learning*” (PBL). Students work in groups towards the digitised solution. In allocated groups students bring their individual knowledge and skills back to their groups for discussion and sharing. During these collaborations students benefit from the knowledge and skills of the other group members. The PBL process is staged in 3 sets of 8 steps and students are assessed on their 1) collaboration skills; 2) individual research skills; and 3) group project solution reached at the end of the subject. *Problem-based learning (PBL) is a method of learning and teaching which allows students to focus on how and what they will learn. An unfamiliar problem, situation or task is presented to the students (by the lecturer or tutor) and students are required to determine for themselves how they will go about solving the problem. This usually occurs through small group work and allows students to utilise their prior knowledge in the topic area and identify the gaps in their knowledge as they attempt to solve the problem. PBL is a studentcentred approach to learning that encourages students to be selfdirected, interdependent and independent as they attempt to solve the set problem.

The subject introduces business practices such as costing, time management, value engineering and general models of monetising and valuing output typical of a variety of design industries. Case study analyses’ of a typical design industry business practices, domestic and international, acquaint students with the differences and similarities that exist. Students learn about contractual agreements, and where appropriate become familiar with international shipping and distribution terms as well as an introduction to design copyright laws. Initial overview of time allocation practices and the creation and understanding costing terms such as: Bill Of Material (BOM) /Scope of Work / Deliverables used in typical projects is followed by application. Students plan a project from start to finish through to the development of an appropriate project management plan for their particular industry such as time management charts with typical dependencies highlighted and costed.

This subject further develops creative and technical knowledge and skills in character animation. The subject covers the creation and application of custom character rigs along with facial, muscle and deformation systems to enable complex character animation. Traditional acting and directing concepts and principles are explored as a means of informing the character animation process and enriching animated performances. The subject also explores the use of nonlinear and procedural animation techniques as part of an animation production pipeline.

This subject focuses on the development of modelling and 3D design skills suitable for the creation of photorealistic and animated visualisations. Students will learn 3D design principles and techniques specific to the creation of photorealistic 3D imagery, including texture creation, lighting and photo-real rendering toolsets. In addition to learning about photorealist approaches, students will also have the opportunity to design and develop bespoke stylistic visual approaches as alternatives to photorealism. The subject also explores the creation of animated 3D simulations in order to visualise processes and systems.

This subject introduces the core theory and practice of 3D character animation. Students learn the creative and technical skills needed to rig props and characters for keyframe and performance capture animation. Fundamental character animation theory concepts and principles including character design, narrative, weight and timing are explored in order to inform animation design and development. The subject also introduces particle and rigid body dynamics as means of creating and augmenting animated sequences and content.

This subject focuses on the design and modelling of characters suitable for 3D visualisation and animation. The subject explores organic and inorganic modelling principles and techniques for character body and face creation. Students learn how to create surface and subcutaneous anatomy, and how to create 3D textures by manipulating original source imagery. Throughout the subject, students learn how to apply concepts and principles of character creation to visualise personality, emotion and affect in 3D virtual characters.

The elective subject can be taken from levels 200 or 300.

The elective subject can be taken from levels 200 or 300.

Students will be offered the opportunity to work within a professional design studio experience for an extended period of time. It encourages students to build long-term relationships with the design industry and exposes them to the rigour of applied design practice while building their confidence in adapting to new environments. It also provides a context in which to enhance their communication skills and work collaboratively in a professional arena. Students will be matched to an appropriate mentor at the placement site and monitored by an academic in the discipline of study.

Here for good. We believe society is best served when our students, faculty, and our entire organisation use our collective skills and experience to create positive and lasting change. Our students and graduates are improving lives and making our world better. Our institutions are providing the critical skills, knowledge and support to help make this happen. Social Enterprise is an exciting theoretical based subject driven by the desire to create positive change through entrepreneurial activities. By providing students with a framework to understand business model generation and the skills to source, evaluate, and measure opportunities, Social Enterprise empowers students to conceptualise, develop, and propose new ventures that focus primarily on social change for good. In addition, this subject helps students understand and analyse different entrepreneurial business strategies, as well as incorporate theoretical discussions on major trends and issues in the social economy.

This subject addresses new and emerging technologies, methods and practice within the 3D design and animation field. Students investigate specific current examples of emerging practice within the field, assess their potential applications and appraise their creative and commercial potential. Students gain practical experience in the adoption of new concepts, processes and techniques through the completion of a research project. The subject also requires students to critically reflect on, document and communicate a research process and findings to a 3D design and animation community of practice.

This subject covers the principles, methods and structures required for collaborative team-based 3D animation production. Students will develop nonlinear, team-based pipelines to coordinate the production of projects with multiple characters, sets, props and assets. Pipeline planning and scripting will be introduced as a way to optimize workflow. The subject also covers animation production and production design concepts and techniques in order to equip students with strategies for the consistent direction of visual style, staging, acting and performance across a collaborative team-based production.

This subject covers the design and creation of 3D environments suitable for integration with live action and photographic imagery, and the fundamental knowledge and skills required in order to create successful composites of 3D and live action elements. Students will learn the essential compositing techniques required by 3D artists and animators, including tracking techniques for integrating 3D elements into moving camera shots. Students also learn how to prepare, render and deliver 3D design and animation assets in formats suitable for a range of compositing and visual effects uses and applications.

In this subject students will research and develop self-promotion materials in preparation for employment. Students will be expected in this unit to review, revise and edit their existing body of design work. They will be expected to frame and deliver this work with an emphasis on self-reflection and identification of a personal brand and value proposition in relation to a chosen design industry sector.