Bachelor of Communication Design

Become a designer in demand

Communication design is a growth industry, with strong demand for designers who are skilled visual communicators across graphic design, traditional print work, as well as digital media extensions and multidisciplinary design.

Nationally recognised and highly respected, Billy Blue Bachelor of Communication Design is a comprehensive design qualification that has been developed and is taught by leaders in the visual communication design world: from brand and design consultants, to graphic designers and creative directors.

In this degree you will focus on the creation of visual messages, ideas and information for a range of audiences. You will develop broad visual communication design skills informed by theoretical and technical knowledge and able to apply those skills to real world graphic design outcomes.

Throughout the course you will explore essential areas of communication design including; typography, image generation, branding, information design, packaging and branded environments. An emphasis on creativity, design thinking, collaborative practice and problem solving will add depth to your practice.

You’ll graduate a highly qualified designer with in-demand skills and a professional-caliber portfolio to land serious work in the ever exciting, always evolving creative industries.

CRICOS CODE
090295A

Key Study Outcomes:

About the School

This course is provided by Billy Blue College of Design at Torrens University Australia. RTO 41343 CRICOS 03389E.

Read more about Billy Blue College of Design

Billy Blue College of Design

Course Delivery

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Workload and Assessment

No. of timetabled hours per week:

Each subject involves 10 hours of study per week, comprising 4 timetabled study hours and 6 personal study hours.

Typical assessment includes:

Practical assignments, research projects, presentations and reports

Subject Information

Design Studio 2 offers an introduction to the building blocks of creating and developing brands and is designed to give students a broad understanding of the stages and methodologies adopted in the brand development process. The subject draws on the theory and practice that sits behind brand creation. It covers the broad spectrum of brand development, values, trends and branding techniques, as well as fundamentals such as brand positioning and brand architecture. The subject also explores the relationship between branding and audiences, cross-cultural influences and shifts in consumer behaviour. Students must first understand and apply the fundamentals of branding and then go on to use that knowledge as the basis for developing and progressing a brand. This theoretical and practical subject will equip students with the knowledge and insight with which to build their own branding expertise.

This subject develops students’ understanding of typographic convention in both traditional and contemporary applications. Students will use their understanding of basic typographic formatting, page composition and layout to explore advanced typographic setting, work flow and content editing across print and digital platforms.

Students will also explore the role of typographic narrative within the sequenced delivery of information across a variety of environments. They will be challenged to consider the ‘voice of type’ and develop a greater appreciation and understanding of how content is read and viewed in traditional and non-traditional mediums.

The subject introduces the student to various aspects of the elements of design, e.g. materiality, form and shape, colour, positive and negative space etc. utilised in creative problem solving. Initially students are introduced to a design development process, from the tangible to the digital; through paper model making with its inherent skills development and risk taking, then on to further digital development using newly introduced software. Concurrent, weekly, individual homework tasks focus on understanding and appreciation of materials, their many varied uses, properties and the manufacturing processes related to them. Students will make incremental progress towards choosing a material in which their individual design can be realised. The submission will include a material and colour folio. The final submission will be a model executed in an appropriate material with its function/usage contextualised with all relevant information gleaned throughout the trimester.

This introductory subject places design process and practice within the context of a chronological survey of major historical eras of influence. Students are encouraged to engage with the historical socio-political movements influencing design trends of each era through research and reflection. Academic skills (research, referencing, essay writing, and sentence structure) and design software skills are taught in weekly lessons. Students use the academic and software skills to document historical research and generate creative responses to the themes of historical eras.

This subject advances students’ understanding of publishing design in both traditional and contemporary applications. Students will use their understanding of basic typographic settings, page composition and layout to explore advanced typographic setting, workflow and content editing. Students will be challenged to consider the ‘voice of type’ and develop a greater appreciation and understanding of how content is read and viewed through a variety of mediums. They will embrace traditional bookbinding and construction methods alongside screen based, digital applications to realise design outcomes. Students will work both individually and in small teams, reflecting the experiences and structure of a publishing team. Through lectures, workshops and tutorials, students will investigate methods and techniques central to publishing design, considering content generation, document sequencing, publishing terminology and advanced typographic settings crucial to a comprehensive understanding of contemporary publishing design.

This subject introduces students to the theory and practice of Information Design. Students will visualise both quantitative and qualitative data from a variety of sources via linear and non-linear typography, signs, icons, pictograms and mapping techniques. They will explore theories and practical approaches that examine instructional systems, methods to convey instructions and complex information systems. Working individually students are required to research a number of given topics. They will analyse and process this information within the context of the LATCH organisational system, demonstrating their knowledge via the design of a series of visual graphics that dramatise both the research they have conducted and the skills they have gained.

This subject introduces students to the theory and practice of Information Design. Students will visualise both quantitative and qualitative data from a variety of sources via linear and non-linear typography, signs, icons, pictograms and mapping techniques. They will explore theories and practical approaches that examine instructional systems, methods to convey instructions and complex information systems.

Working individually and as part of a small team, students are required to research a number of given topics. They will analyse and process this information within the context of the LATCH organisational system, demonstrating their knowledge via the design of a series of visual graphics that dramatise both the research they have conducted and the skills they have gained.

This subject examines ideas and techniques within the practice of narrative photography. Through lectures examining historical milestones in photography and camera and lighting practical tutorials in understanding the accepted rules, students will gain the confidence to make innovative choices in their creative photography production processes. Students will develop creative narrative photography

Through the production of a multi-panel photo sequence, informed creative choices will be demonstrated.

The aim of this subject is for students to develop and employ Major specific skills to discover and define a design problem followed by the development and delivery of an outcome whilst employing collaboration and negotiation skills. Every individual works towards prototypes, instigated and critiqued through group collaboration. The construct of this subject is “Problem Based Learning*” (PBL). Students work in groups towards an individual solution as a result of critique and research as a basis for PBL. In allocated groups, individual knowledge and skills are brought back to the groups for discussion and sharing. During these collaborations students benefit from the knowledge and skills and critique of the other group members. The PBL process is staged in 2 sets, students are assessed on their 1) collaboration skills; 2) individual research skills; and 3) individual project solution reached at the end of the subject. *Problem-based learning (PBL) is a method of learning and teaching which allows students to focus on how and what they will learn. An unfamiliar problem, situation or task is presented to the students (by the lecturer or tutor) and students are required to determine for themselves how they will go about solving the problem. This usually occurs through small group work and allows students to utilise their prior knowledge in the topic area and identify the gaps in their knowledge as they attempt to solve the problem. PBL is a studentcentred approach to learning that encourages students to be selfdirected, interdependent and independent as they attempt to solve the set problem.

The aim of this subject is for students to develop and employ their digital skills to answer to, and present a design outcome whilst developing collaboration skills. The project outcome focuses on the digital application of the design solution. This can be by means of 3D printing of the prototypes and/or digital augmentation of a physical 3D environment or 2D document. The construct of this subject is “Problem Based Learning*” (PBL). Students work in groups towards the digitised solution. In allocated groups students bring their individual knowledge and skills back to their groups for discussion and sharing. During these collaborations students benefit from the knowledge and skills of the other group members. The PBL process is staged in 3 sets of 8 steps and students are assessed on their 1) collaboration skills; 2) individual research skills; and 3) group project solution reached at the end of the subject. *Problem-based learning (PBL) is a method of learning and teaching which allows students to focus on how and what they will learn. An unfamiliar problem, situation or task is presented to the students (by the lecturer or tutor) and students are required to determine for themselves how they will go about solving the problem. This usually occurs through small group work and allows students to utilise their prior knowledge in the topic area and identify the gaps in their knowledge as they attempt to solve the problem. PBL is a studentcentred approach to learning that encourages students to be selfdirected, interdependent and independent as they attempt to solve the set problem.

The subject introduces business practices such as costing, time management, value engineering and general models of monetising and valuing output typical of a variety of design industries. Case study analyses’ of a typical design industry business practices, domestic and international, acquaint students with the differences and similarities that exist. Students learn about contractual agreements, and where appropriate become familiar with international shipping and distribution terms as well as an introduction to design copyright laws. Initial overview of time allocation practices and the creation and understanding costing terms such as: Bill Of Material (BOM) /Scope of Work / Deliverables used in typical projects is followed by application. Students plan a project from start to finish through to the development of an appropriate project management plan for their particular industry such as time management charts with typical dependencies highlighted and costed.

This subject expands practical and theoretical understanding of Information design and introduces concepts of wayfinding systems. The challenge of navigating three-dimensional spaces, in conjunction with the consideration of time-based issues are also introduced. Screen-based interfaces and environmental contexts form a key part of this unit as students explore the role of the narrative within the sequenced delivery of information. Working as individuals and in small groups, students will research various non-digital and digital information environments. They will analyse their data and apply knowledge to develop solutions to the navigational problems they have identified. They will dramatise their findings and design an instructional system to facilitate implementation of their outcomes.

This subject is concerned with generating typographic letterforms and systems that are expandable in form and application while addressing issues of legibility, readability and versatility. Students will experiment within the frameworks of technical and typographic innovation. Through the creation of key characters, a systematic approach and the context of a cultural framework, communication through abstract shape and image, while still retaining necessary considerations towards readabi lity and accessibility is established.

Students will be encouraged to adopt a mindset of innovation in the production of original alphabets and to consider commercial applications by designing and producing promotional pieces to market their typographic creations.

This subject expands the understanding of symbols, signs and semantic conventions within communication systems and media. Students are introduced to the history and application of semiotics and encouraged to review, relate and re-evaluate design and communication strategies within the context of de-constructing conventional thinking and design practices. There is particular reference to the cultural shift from words to pictures and the role of meaning in an evolving creative and technological environment. Students present individual and group solutions for the development of a system of symbols and information graphics.

This subject encourages students to analyse and evaluate the effectiveness of contemporary corporate identity and branding systems. Students will develop a deeper understanding of the elements that make a successful brand, challenging the misconception of identity marks as the sole component of a modern brand. Typography and its applications are central features within this subject, providing a level of consistency within a myriad of often, unrelated components. Through lectures, tutorials and practical workshops, students will explore alternative brand touch points and create unique visual expressions withina diverse framework. These strategies and developments will manifest themselves in a variety of environmental and communication pieces, including stationery, advertising communications, signage, way-finding and vehicle livery. Students will work individually to investigate methods and techniques that can be used to establish a coherent visual language across a variety of mediums. Central to their experience will be the notion of what a brand is and how the designer can add value to business through visual and non-visual components. Students will embrace the function of typography as a vehicle to communicate in literal and abstract terms, developing their understanding of tone of voice, hierarchy structures, and material selection and specification.

This subject focuses on developing a broader understanding of design portfolios and presentations within the context of current industry directions. Students will participate in self-directed research and evaluate contemporary styles and methods of presentation. Students examine target markets, identifying the specific needs and preferences of the design industry by analysing self-promotional, print and digital portfolio materials. This subject provides a framework for students to create a dialogue between themselves and the design industry

Working independently, students will explore their own design philosophy and use this to compose an effective self-promotional presentation targeting potential employers or clients. Additionally, students will create a design portfolio appropriate to their chosen field, demonstrating an understanding of effective self-branding, page-sequence and personal narrative.

This subject examines the effect design has on instigating social innovation and change. Students are introduced to the reality and constraints of working with a real-world client on a major live project. Students will utilise holistic, people-focused methodologies to investigate the social, ethical and human impact of design, whilst ensuring emphasis is placed on the positive effect and critical influence of design on society. By identifying an emotional and authentic core to the project they will be required to demonstrate a critical understanding of the design process so as to move beyond purely commercial and brand centered practices.

Students will be offered the opportunity to work within a professional design studio experience for an extended period of time. It encourages students to build long-term relationships with the design industry and exposes them to the rigour of applied design practice while building their confidence in adapting to new environments. It also provides a context in which to enhance their communication skills and work collaboratively in a professional arena. Students will be matched to an appropriate mentor at the placement site and monitored by an academic in the discipline of study.

Here for good. We believe society is best served when our students, faculty, and our entire organisation use our collective skills and experience to create positive and lasting change. Our students and graduates are improving lives and making our world better. Our institutions are providing the critical skills, knowledge and support to help make this happen. Social Enterprise is an exciting theoretical based subject driven by the desire to create positive change through entrepreneurial activities. By providing students with a framework to understand business model generation and the skills to source, evaluate, and measure opportunities, Social Enterprise empowers students to conceptualise, develop, and propose new ventures that focus primarily on social change for good. In addition, this subject helps students understand and analyse different entrepreneurial business strategies, as well as incorporate theoretical discussions on major trends and issues in the social economy.

This subject provides a deeper understanding of packaging design with students designing and producing a complete packaging solution for a product under any brand that delivers visual identity, exceptional in-store shelf presence and user-friendly experience. Ideal solutions will address key sustainability issues while identifying contemporary trends and current industry directions. Where appropriate, suitable live packaging projects may form the basis for detailed briefs. Students are encouraged to create distinct holistic packaging solutions – not merely a refresh of a brand’s visual identity. The more cohesive and distinctive the solution the better. The packaging solution must be commercially viable from materials, printing and merchandising perspectives.

This subject builds on the skill sets created in User-centered Design, encouraging students to take a holistic approach to the creation of meaningful ‘cradle to grave’ user experiences. This theoretically based subject challenges students to consider audience, purpose and context, while creating personas & stories to help deliver practical, group outcomes that fuse commercial reality with design thinking tools. It emphasizes observation, collaboration, fast learning, visualization of ideas, concept prototyping, and concurrent business analysis, which ultimately influence innovation and business strategy.

This subject focuses on defining the value of design in modern business. It embeds a systematic process for leveraging relationships between design and business processes and encourages students to think through design to exceed user’s needs. Students must understand and influence how people give meaning to things, by transforming ideas from conception to innovative business strategies. Students can generate unique user- centred offerings, build emotional brand engagements and gain insight into all aspects of establishing a unique and viable business. Students are required to conduct research, analyse and define an entrepreneurial and commercially viable opportunity.

This subject examines how new ideas and end-user experiences are translated into marketable products or services and how design driven innovation creates new meaning to deliver competitive advantage. It also looks at the seductive power of design thinking to match necessity to utility, constraint to possibility, and need to demand. Working in small collaborative teams students are required to embrace the multifaceted challenges we encounter everyday in society, and describe and define an innovative and sustainable solution to a user experience problem.

Student Showcase