Graduate Certificate of Education (Special Education)

Develop advanced technical skills and knowledge to improve educational outcomes

The Graduate Certificate of Education (Special Education) takes a Design Thinking approach to analyse issues and challenges faced by persons with a range of additional learning needs.

Informed by advanced theoretical knowledge, the Graduate Certificate of Education (Special Education) focuses on problem solving from a person first perspective. The person first approach allows situations to be tackled from the perspective of the individual, and by doing so shifts the focus from a passive acceptance from the person at the centre of the issue to a more active role where their individual needs are actively considered.

The Graduate Certificate of Education (Special Education) also includes topics specific to issues facing contemporary educators, such as Autism, Mental Health and Learning Differences.

Graduates of the Graduate Certificate of Education (Special Education) can progress to further postgraduate studies in related fields of education. They can also advance and diversify their position in the education field, such as advisory roles. Further, a qualification in special education opens opportunities for Graduates to work in special schools as well as expert roles in mainstream schools.

CRICOS CODE
095588C

About the School

This course is delivered by Torrens University Australia Ltd, ABN 99 154 937 005, RTO 41343, CRICOS 03389E.

Read more about Torrens University Australia

Torrens University Australia

Course Delivery

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Workload and Assessment

No. of timetabled hours per week:

It is expected that each subject, whether studied online or on-campus, will involve a combined total of 120 hours of structured and self-directed learning, which equates to approximately 10 hours a week for subjects over 12-week trimesters.

Typical assessment includes:

Assessments within the Graduate Certificate of Education (Special Education) vary in submission outcome, including (but not limited to):

  • Reflective journal/Blog

  • Portfolio

  • Report/Essay

  • Presentation/Pitch

  • Research

  • Collaboration/Facilitation of discussion

  • Negotiated tasks

  • Scenario responses

  • Problem based tasks

Subject Information

Students are introduced to a range of Mental Health conditions, understanding the complexity and interrelatedness between the challenges associated within each. The person first approach is used in this subject to introduce the problem solving skills required when supporting an individual with Mental Health conditions. Students interact with a range of experiential perspectives of Mental Health, using interviews and scenarios to develop the person first approach. A range of perspectives, experiences, challenges and aspirations in the Mental Health community creates a platform for students to examine both the community and their own bias, prejudice and assumptions. Further, the range of carers involved in Mental Health conditions is considered for a deeper awareness of the impact of the conditions.

The person first approach is used in this subject to introduce the problem solving skills required when supporting an individual with learning differences, including but not limited to dyslexia, dyspraxia, dyscalculia and ADHD. This subject also explores the impact these challenges have on self-esteem and future learning aspirations. Further, examples of stereotyping, types of interventions and the genetic disposition of the learning challenges are discussed.

This subject develops students’ awareness and understanding by analysing the range of traits across each learning condition. Presenting in various ways and areas of learning development, the stigmatised learning challenges are often described from a deficit viewpoint. Students will be analysing the history of such conditions and the evolution of interventions and support, in turn, continuing to evolve an attribute view of the traits of these conditions.

 

Viewed across a spectrum, dyslexia can be difficult to recognise. By expanding on the understanding of dyslexia traits and range of support tools, this subject uncovers the complexity of dyslexia and how to recognise and support individuals. Students will be presented with perspectives from the lived experience of individuals and parents demonstrating varying contexts and levels of support requirements. Understanding how this condition can impact an individual’s education creates the platform for students to apply their knowledge to put contemporary practices of support in the classroom.

Contemporary practice in Autism education requires sound knowledge, understanding and support by educators to effectively create an inclusive and best practice learning environment. A movement in the disability sector advocates for individuals and their carers to have their voice heard. In this subject, students examine the shift in support for individuals with Autism and their carers. More specifically, the Autism community to move to a voice that is heard, rather than passive. The person first approach is used in this subject to introduce the problem solving skills required when supporting an individual with Autism by actively listening to their needs. Students will interact with a range of experiential perspectives of Autism, using interviews and scenarios to develop the person first approach. Interactions with the varying perspectives, experiences, challenges and aspirations in the Autism community creates a platform for students to examine bias, prejudice and assumptions. The voice of the individual with Autism and their carers in this subject unveils the importance of active listening and co-design for learning.

Further, an exploration of the evolution of Autism education, based on the medical theory in relation to diagnosis of Autism. Spanning early 1940’s to the twenty first century, introduces students to the complexity of Autism, the development of knowledge and application in education systems. This subject asks students to explore the Autism diagnosis and the impact on individuals and the Autism community. Further, students’ understanding is deepened when asked to critique the social implications, relating to discrimination, policy and practices specific to the history of Autism, using a person first perspective.